Photography: June


 

Another month and another set of pictures. These are some I’ve taken in the past as I was experimenting with high contrast, silhouettes and lomo. Hope you like them 🙂

 

 

Airfield Child

Airfield Child

Sky Fire

Sky Fire

Explosion in the Sky

Explosion in the Sky

Goodbye

Goodbye

Out of the Clouds

Out of the Clouds

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London Reverie


 

The above video has been shared around the Internet ever since it came out. I’m just getting around to it now because I’m lazy and save topics to write about later. But this one was important to me for a single solitary reason: London

As far as I’m concerned, London is by far the greatest city that exists on this blue marble called Earth. The video elicited memories and emotions within me that hold a very dear place within my heart. In fact, they are the very essence of the creature I am today.

A distance of 3,300 miles separates me from it, but I still hear the whispers of London in my ear. It beckons me to reside within its storied thoroughfares once again and finish what I started. I can still recall how the air invigorated my senses and cajoled my melancholy down cultured and artful avenues. I vividly remember standing under the dizzying lights of Piccadilly Circus with my best mate as we stood in awe and inhaled the possibilities that surrounded us. We had inherited a city which could devour you if you so much as slipped. We weren’t afraid or proud. We were humbled and blessed.

The imagery in the video made me realise just how ingrained the city is in my mind. I can close my eyes and instantly transport myself back to my apartment in Pennington Court in the beating heart of the city. From there, I take a lengthy constitution across Tower Bridge and head down to the Queen’s Walk. And so on and so forth, as I retrace those footprints I left behind in the concrete soul of the city. Angel, Chelsea, Hammersmith, Waterloo, Liverpool Street and Convent Garden are not merely destinations. The Thames is not just a river. They are places of reverence where hearts were broken, love was made, drinks were had, stories were shared, and memories were forged. 

I might have left London almost 3 years ago, but its riddle still haunts me. Perhaps that’s because there are entire worlds in London that I never got to experience. I hope to return one day in a more permanent role upon its stage. Until then, London and I remain starcrossed lovers.

London: this city of dreams, this city of kings and queens. 

Ω

Gravity Waves from Big Bang Detected!


Big news in Cosmology today of a landmark discovery.

From Scientific American:

“Physicists have found a long-predicted twist in light from the Big Bang that represents the first image of ripples in the universe called gravitational waves, researchers announced today. The finding is direct proof of the theory of inflation, the idea that the universe expanded extremely quickly in the first fraction of a second after it was born. What’s more, the signal is coming through much more strongly than expected, ruling out a large class of inflation models and potentially pointing the way toward new theories of physics, experts say. “

In layman terms, this is robust evidence of an “echo” from the big bang which brought the Universe into existence 14bn years ago, and  it allows scientists to witness how the Universe came into existence. In other words, it is the very encouraging physical evidence for the theory of inflation. Think of it as ripples spreading outwards in water or waves crossing an ocean. These primordial gravitational waves will tell us about the first, infinitesimal moment of the universe’s history and its obvious expansion. Of course, these waves are not exclusive to the Big Bang, but are ripples in the curvature of spacetime which exist throughout space emanating from different sources (e.g. black holes, cosmic explosions).

The Guardian explains all these terms well here.

Needless to say this is fascinating stuff that promises to expand our understanding and reverence of the cosmos in brand new ways. Old questions will be answered, and new ones will be born. Old technologies will be improved, and new ones will be dreamt of. Einstein predicted all this way back in 1916 in his Theory of General Relativity and remained its sole untested prediction. It took scientists only 98 years to prove it. What a bunch of slackers!

Here is the beautiful moment Andrei Linde, one of the authors of inflationary theory and who in 1983 first described chaotic inflation, is told that his theory was correct 🙂


Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/inflation-theorist-andrei-linde-hears-bicep2-news-2014-3#ixzz2wFNkYl1A

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How Big is Space? Take a Look for Yourself


Since the world is still reeling from the return of Cosmos hosted by the ineffable Neil DeGrasse Tyson, I figured it would be a good idea to a space related post (mainly because I’m shameless want more hits). If you haven’t seen Cosmos, then go watch it…after you finish reading and telling your friends about my post.

The almost always awesome BBC has put together a fantastic  interactive that allows you pilot a tiny rocket to the edge of our Solar System. That’s over 20 BILLION KM away! That would take you 20 hours to complete if you were on the Starship Enterprise travelling at Warp 1.

Suit up and buckle in for your journey here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbc.com/future/bespoke/20140304-how-big-is-space-interactive/index.html

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This is what Earth looks like from Mars


This view of the twilight sky and Martian horizon taken by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover includes Earth as the brightest point of light in the night sky. Earth is a little left of center in the image, and our moon is just below Earth.

Can you see it? Not yet? Well lean in a little bit closer and look at the white dot. No, that’s not a dead pixel. That Infinitesimal point in the Martian sky is the planet we call home.

The humbling photo comes courtesy of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratories and was snapped by our envoy the Mars Curiosity rover.

NASA says:

Researchers used the left eye camera of Curiosity’s Mast Camera (Mastcam) to capture this scene about 80 minutes after sunset on the 529th Martian day, or sol, of the rover’s work on Mars (Jan. 31, 2014). The image has been processed to remove effects of cosmic rays.

The distance between the two cosmic neighbors was a mere 99 million miles (160 million km). I have to admit that it’s an incredibly beautiful photo. Here is a larger image.

Someone, anthropomorphically speaking, is sitting on another planet looking back at us and communicating with us. That’s a mindblowing thought. Before too long, I expect that it will actually be humans transcending stellar and physiological boundaries to send messages back to Earth from another planet.

The final frontier, indeed.

Ω